Audubon Society offers DIY solution to the effects of climate change

news release

Tired of waiting for government action on the climate crisis? The Pelican Island Audubon Society has come up with a way you can fight climate change on your own — plant native trees and shrubs.

The Pelican Island Audubon Society is making them available at affordable prices (see order form below). According to Dr. Richard Baker, president of the Society, “Our goal is to plant 100,000 native trees and plants in our county and do our part to save our precious birds, our quality of life and ultimately to save our planet.”

Why plant trees?

Enhance our quality of life:

  • Provide food and shelter.
  • Kids play outside more—less ADHD, asthma, obesity, harmful sun exposure.
  • Know your neighbors, get exercise, better health.
  • Produces oxygen eliminates the CO2.
  • 50% less crime
  • Reduces noise pollution & reduces speeding.

Economic Benefits:

  • Property values 5-20% higher.
  • Save 60% in asphalt-maintenance costs over 30 years.
  • Customers to stay longer, increase property values and increase worker satisfaction.
  • Cut cooling costs 30-50%.
  • Cools parking lots, cars, rooftops and cities.
  • Slows evaporation and runoff
  • Save much water.

Environmental Health, including the Indian River Lagoon:

  • Reduce stormwater carrying oil, chemicals, and gas runoff soil erosion.
  • Retain organic material that will form muck.
  • Absorb odors, ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and ozone.
  • Reduce fertilizer and herbicide use and runoff.

Baker continues, “This will not begin to replace all we have paved over, but we can save irrigation expense, water, fertilizer, replace Co2 with oxygen, and bring back wildlife to our living areas.  Let’s discover how to be a part of nature and save ourselves.”

Bring birds to your yard; plant native trees and plants available now through the Pelican Island Audubon Society. 

Trees: Dahoon holly, Long-Leaf Pine, Mahogany, Myrtle Oak, Sand Live Oak, Sand Pine, Slash Pine Vines: Coral Honeysuckle, Cross Vine Flowers: Black-eyed Susan, Blanket flower, Blazing Star, Blue Porterweed, Cardinal flower, Horsemint, Lanceleaf Coreopsis, , Leavenworth’s Coreopsis, Seaside Goldenrod, Stokes Aster, and Tropical Salvia Ground Covers: Frogfruit, Shoreline Sea-Purslane Grass/Grass-like Plant: FL Gamagrass Palm: Cabbage Palm Shrubs: Beach-creeper, Beautyberry, Buttonbush, Coontie, Firebush, Florida Privet, Gallberry, Saltbush, Sea-oxeye daisy, Satin Leaf Coffee, Seagrape, Shiny Leaf Coffee, Simpson’s stopper, Spanish bayonet, Walter’s Viburnum, Wax myrtle, White Indigo Berry

Why plant trees?

Human Well-being: Provide food and shelter. Kids play outside more—less ADHD, asthma, obesity, harmful sun exposure. Know your neighbors, get exercise, better health. Produces oxygen eliminates the CO2. 50% less crime Reduces noise pollution & reduces speeding.

Economic Benefits: Property values 5-20% higher. Save 60% in asphalt-maintenance costs over 30 years. Customers to stay longer, increase property values and increase worker satisfaction. Cut cooling costs 30-50%. Cools parking lots, cars, rooftops and cities. Slows evaporation and runoff Save much water.

Environmental Health, including the Indian River Lagoon: Reduce stormwater carrying oil, chemicals, and gas runoff soil erosion. Retain organic material that will form muck. Absorb odors, ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and ozone. Reduce fertilizer and herbicide use and runoff.

Planting native trees can help tackle all these problems. Let’s Save Indian River County for Future Generations!

Check our prices and select your trees and shrubs with our handy order form by clicking here.

Comment - Please use your first and last name. Comments of up to 350 words are welcome.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s