Was it a bird? A plane? A rocket? Swamp gas?

COMMENTARY

MILT THOMAS

this appeared on Facebook.

If you were up just before sunrise on New Year’s Day (or had not yet gone to bed), you may have noticed a strange phenomenon looking east over the ocean. Different photos flooded the Internet that appear to show a rocket or missile with a fiery contrail moving extremely fast in a vertical trajectory.

However, the US Department of Defense claims it was in fact a commercial airplane whose contrail was captured in the rising morning sun. Really?

At one time years ago, a UFO was spotted over forest and the official explanation was “swamp gas.” A cartoon some time after that depicted two cavemen looking at the remains of a WWI era biplane and one turned to the other and said, “swamp gas.” No one bought that explanation then, and I don’t buy this one now.

This image appeared on Twitter.

Getting back to what was observed on New Year’s Day, I guess the photos appear to show a rocket, not an airplane, because it is shaped like a bullet, not like any commercial airplane I have ever seen, unless this is another Elon Musk invention. I have never seen a fiery contrail behind an airplane, and if I did, I would probably call 9-1-1. I also note that most airplanes travel more or less on a horizontal trajectory, not a vertical one, unless it had just taken off from out in the middle of the ocean somewhere.

So, sorry, DOD, I don’t buy the swamp gas-like explanation of what multiple people actually saw and recorded.

A while back, I also personally experienced another unexplained sky event. I was driving south on A1A just before sunrise one morning and thought a car was some distance behind me until the headlights suddenly headed skyward over the ocean. I pulled over to watch what was obviously a rocket. It reached several miles high, then suddenly exploded. It was quite a spectacle as it caught the first rays of morning sun. The incident was never reported by any media. The year was 1961.

 

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